Worth Seeing Near Dublin

Glendalough Round Tower Worth Seeing Near Dublin

Glendalough Round Tower

Just 48 kilometres outside Dublin, Glendalough is the perfect day trip destination for the visitor and is definitely one of the best places worth seeing near Dublin. There has been a settlement here since about 500 AD, when St. Kevin founded a monastery here with seven enchanting churches. However, the village’s name is inspired by the two lakes beside which it was established. A day trip is not merely about the destination, however; the journey is also an experience in itself. The route, which follows a southerly direction from Dublin, first follows the coastline towards Bray, then heads inland and around the Little and Great Sugar Loaf Mountains. On the way to Roundwood, (reputed to be the most elevated Irish village,) then as you make the road to Annamoe Valley and Laragh village, lakes and bogs covered in colourful plants await you. Once in Glendalough itself, probably one of the first landmarks you will see is the 108ft high round tower, built by the monks. Glendalough was visited recently by Michelle Obama and her children during their visit to Ireland.

Dalkey makes for an ideal day trip, as it is where notable celebrities such as Enya, Van Morrison and Bono, to name just a few, reside. As it is only 16km from Dublin City, it is also very accessible. The easiest and most convenient way to get here is by DART (Dublin’s rail system), which follows the spectacular coastline to take you to this pretty town. However, there is more to see here than Irish stars; Dalkey Castle, dating from the 1400s,  and its Heritage Centre are also deserving of a visit. Every day Living History Tours tell the story of the fortified structure and the settlement which built up around it. Negotiating the battlements is well worth the effort, as they look out over the Irish Sea, mountains and Dalkey Island. It is said that people lived on this tiny island as far back as 4500BC. If you want more history, make your way to St. Begnet’s Church & Graveyard, dating from around 900 AD. Dalkey Town Hall, built in the late 1800s, is still a working building. The town has proved popular over the years with many famous Irish writers, such as James Joyce and George Bernard Shaw. Wander around and the part which the town played in these writers’ lives and their works shall be revealed.

Rhinos at Dublin Zoo

Rhinos at Dublin Zoo

It is generally accepted that the best way to get a feel for a city is to walk around it, and Dublin is no different. A number of local companies offer walking tours of the capital, if you aren’t entirely comfortable with your own navigation skills. One of the most popular pedestrian attractions is the Phoenix Park – the biggest park in Europe. It is where Áras an Uachtaráin (the residence of the President) is to be found, and guided tours are on offer every Saturday. Dublin Zoo is also located here, along with the Papal Cross, where Pope John Paul II celebrated mass in 1979.

If you are feeling energetic, the gorgeous Sugar Loaf mountain, in County Wicklow,  is worth a hike as it offers great views of the surrounding area. A less demanding walk is the scenic walk from Bray to Greystones, which offers views of various sea life off the coast, such as seals. Glendalough is also the perfect place for walkers, with a host of trails and paths to choose from which take you past all the historic sights, such as the seven churches and the round tower of the monastery, established by Saint Kevin around 500 AD.

 

Jameson Distillery

Jameson Distillery

Jameson’s Distillery is one of the most traditional spots on a sightseeing itinerary, as it is the most popular of all Irish whiskeys. This is a fascinating building, where you can view the original stone foundations through the transparent floor. The ambience in the building is fantastic, as the tours, catering for small groups, are interactive. Participants can learn all about how whiskey is made, from malting, to fermenting, distilling and maturation. Discover just what is done to all that yeast, water and barley to make such a unique drink. A complimentary Jameson on conclusion of the tour illustrates the fruits of all that labour.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin